Fortune 500 company DXC sign agreement with archTIS

Fortune 500 company, DXC Technology, have purchased an initial 50-seat licence to utilise and showcase Kojensi Enterprise as an on-premise, multi-level security content and collaboration platform.

About DXC
DXC has nearly 6,000 clients in more than 70 countries and is a provider of choice for the National Security Community in Australia. This includes clients such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), Attorney Generals Department (AGD) and Department of Home Affairs.

Helps archTIS showcase product to National Intelligence Community
archTIS has signed an agreement with DXC to showcase Kojensi Enterprise (the on-premise application of Kojensi Gov) to existing and potential clients in the National Intelligence market. This includes purchasing Kojensi licenses to establish a permanent demonstration capability at their secure facility in Canberra. The National Intelligence Community in Australia has an annual budget of over $2 billion and employs approximately 7,000 staff across 10 agencies.

The archTIS Kojensi platform (including its applications to Gov, Field and Enterprise) has been developed over many years working closely with the Department of Defence and has been designed with secure collaboration first and foremost. This lengthy pedigree positions archTIS as one of a very few companies to be able to satisfy the security requirements of national government, military and intelligence agencies.

Generates additional revenue for archTIS' Kojensi suite
The initial 50-seat licence and associated services will generate revenue of approximately $100,000 with more than half being recurring annual revenue.

Helping DXC and government agencies to share intelligence, quickly, collaboratively and securely
Kojensi Enterprise will allow DXC teams and their partners to manage and collaborate on classified documents and files in one secure space on material up to a SECRET classification.

"The Kojensi platform will remove the need for Government Security Agencies to continue to develop costly isolated networks and get on with the job of sharing intelligence, quickly, collaboratively and securely." said DXC's Ric Bulluss.